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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Absconding From Your Probation

    My question involves criminal law for the state of: Louisiana. My husband is on felony probation for DWIs. He was working in Galveston, TX seven on and seven off, so he would be in Texas one week and back home in Louisiana the other week. He had not been reporting to his probation officer, which is what the warrant was originally for. He was pulled over in Galveston and arrested on the warrant. The probation officer has been to our house one time and did not even come in. Has never called him and had four phone numbers for him, never sent him a letter or anything saying that she was trying to contact him. I do understand that it is not the probation officers place to contact him, but aren't they supposed to visit and make sure there are no firearms in the house and things like that? Just because he was working in Texas, does this mean that he was absconding? The absconding charge is the reason he received three years.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,437

    Default Re: Absconding Probation

    Q: Just because he was working in Texas, does this mean that he was absconding?

    A: Yes; in fact, that is the definition of absconding.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Absconding Probation

    My question involves criminal law for the state of: Louisiana. I thought that the definition of absconding was to run or flee arrest or prosecution. Does it meaning just leaving the state too (not running -- just working)?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Behind a Desk
    Posts
    98,846

    Default Re: Absconding

    You mean, in violation of the terms of your probation? Potentially yes.

    if you are forbidden to leave the state under the terms of your probation, get authorization to work in the other state.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Toledo, OH
    Posts
    16,303

    Default Re: Absconding

    Absonding means leaving the jurisdiction.

    If you're wanted for a crime (or you're on probation) and you leave the jurisdiction (without permission if you're on probation), it's absconding.

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