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  1. #1
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    Default Legal Theory and Politics: At-Will Unemployment Compensation

    At-will unemployment insurance in states that have at-will employment laws.

    A discussion of a hypothetical at-will unemployment scheme. In this scenario, unemployment compensation would be available on an at-will basis, similar to employment laws that are at-will. In other words, anyone would be able to apply for any reason, or no reason.

    With at-will unemployment compensation available, employers would be freer to exercise their Ninth Amendment right to create private social contracts that may result in employment, in manners more conducive to their private
    profit motive.

    At-will unemployment would be a more market friendly alternative to legislated welfare schemes.

    A uniform rule on this type of market friendly public policy would provide market recognizable metrics for the US as whole (e.g. GDP).

    An issue of homelessness due to lack of income could be addressed with a minimum wage subsidy based on at-will unemployment. Panhandling laws would have a more ethical, legal, and moral standing, if an indigent person could simply apply for at-will unemployment compensation.

    With lower barriers to entry, the private sector could provide value added products to any guaranteed public sector unemployment compensation.

    People on at-will unemployment would also be freer to perform civic duties, such as jury duty, attend school, or simply pursue happiness.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    I think you are missing the reason we even have UI. It is not a freebie. It is paid for by your previous employers and is s temp subsidy. To be eligable for UI (in most states anyway) you must be able, available, and looking for work.

    The reason you can be denied is the fact that the employer should not be dunned for your improper activities that caused you to be fired.

    What you are suggesting is welfare without responsibilities. Why should we ever allow payment simply because you don;t want to work and at the taxpayers (those folks who are working) expense.

    What you are suggesting is very similar to the communist work guarantees of USSR past. No incentive to work allows people to become irresponsible and lack any reason to be productive either in their life or their job.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    You may be misstating your point. UI was intended to ameliorate the effects of frictional unemployment. The premiums (in California) are paid by the employer. The difference between an at-will scheme, and welfare as we know it, is that an at-will unemployment compensation scheme is more market friendly. Our current welfare schemes are mired in "red-tape" and subject to much more fraud, waste, and abuse than the an at-will unemployment compensation scheme could ever be (since it is at-will).

    In one sense, an at-will unemployment compensation scheme could be considered a minimum wage at which people can be paid to stay out of the labor market, and as simple to administer. I am of the opinion, that any public funding that benefits the markets, and our economy (thus, the populace) can be considered a form of providing for the general Welfare.

    We already have welfare without responsibilities. It is called welfare as we currently know it. That scheme has not solved many of our socioeconomic problems, and is considered, by some, to not be conducive to the pursuit of higher education, art, or happiness.

    An issue of homelessness due to lack of income could be addressed with a minimum wage subsidy based on at-will unemployment. Panhandling laws would have a more ethical, legal, and moral standing, if an indigent person could simply apply for at-will unemployment compensation. How does our current system solve for that?

    Why do you advocate third world economics when we have a first world economy? What recourse does a person have in such an economy when there is no work available due to market inefficiencies that lead to frictional unemployment? Are you implying that the US (and its populace) was better off as a third world country during the industrial revolution?

    An at-will unemployment scheme would also benefit the labor market and our economy by subsidizing less efficient labor market participants to stay out of the market for labor. With at-will unemployment compensation available, employers would be freer to exercise their Ninth Amendment right to create private social contracts that may result in employment, in manners more conducive to their private profit motive. How does welfare, as we know it, accomplish these goals in a manner consistent with out Bill of Rights?

    I am of the opinion, that any self-respecting first world economy can afford to subsidize people to not provide labor input to the economy; in much the same way as corporate welfare subsidizes agribusiness to not produce commodities for the market. How does our current system provide for an income to people on leaves of absence?

    The main difference between a hypothetical at-will unemployment compensation system, and the command economics of the former Soviet model you mentioned, is that an at-will unemployment compensation scheme is market friendly. In other words, market principles still apply. Employers will benefit by having more motivated and productive employees because anyone who would prefer being a couch potato could claim at-will unemployment.

    With lower barriers to entry, the private sector could provide value added products to any guaranteed public sector unemployment compensation. How does our current system enable the private sector to create new and improved financial products for US consumers?

    From another perspective, do you think that ancient Athens would be better or worse off, if they had simply paid Socrates a minimum wage based on at-will unemployment compensation?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    I doubt that you're going to get much traction with the public for a hand-out to able bodied adults who choose not to work, or for people who are fired for cause.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    Welfare as we currently know it is more expensive than a simple and market friendly at-will unemployment scheme that conforms to our social contract (constitution, and specifically the 9A in regards to at-will employment in states that have at-will employment).

    Paying less efficient labor market participants to be couch potatoes helps the employment sector of the labor market in that the more efficient labor market participants will be actively seeking employment.

    No one has any problems with some of the largest agribusinesses in the world asking for a public handout. Why do those same people balk at paying fellow human beings to pursue art, education, or happiness; if they can benefit from better labor market conditions if they choose to provide labor input to the economy?

    Is it more holy and moral to let people stay in third world economic conditions in our first world economy?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    Balderdash.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Legal theory and politics: At-will unemployment compensation.

    Welfare as we currently know it is more expensive than a simple and market friendly at-will unemployment scheme that conforms to our social contract (constitution, and specifically the 9A in regards to at-will employment in states that have at-will employment).
    and how is that. It will be welfare no matter what you want to call it and will be subject to the same inefficiencies and graft as the current methods of welfare face.

    Paying less efficient labor market participants to be couch potatoes helps the employment sector of the labor market in that the more efficient labor market participants will be actively seeking employment.
    How is this. I suggest simply not paying them saves everybody money. If they choose to not work, then they get what they give.

    No one has any problems with some of the largest agribusinesses in the world asking for a public handout. Why do those same people balk at paying fellow human beings to pursue art, education, or happiness; if they can benefit from better labor market conditions if they choose to provide labor input to the economy?
    Subsidies are very different than what you suggest and for different reasons. It is incorrect to compare the two. Not that I totally support subsidies but that is another situation altogether.

    Is it more holy and moral to let people stay in third world economic conditions in our first world economy?[
    Granted, this is far from a perfect nation but the bottom line is, no work, no pay. Anything less would be creating a nation of welfare.

    if people want to get paid, they get to work.

    Since all states (in one regard or another) are employment at will, the employer can chose who to hire and who to retain NOW. They do not have to continue to employ a deadbeat simply because they have hired them.



    Paying less efficient labor market participants to be couch potatoes helps the employment sector of the labor market in that the more efficient labor market participants will be actively seeking employment.
    And how is this? The less efficient will be couch potatoes simply by the laws of supply and demand. If there are better employee possibilities out there, the employer will hire them and divest themselves of the less efficient employees they currently employ.


    The one thing you fail to address. Many of the homeless (males to a much greater degree than females) choose to be homeless and live in third world conditions. They do not wish to apply themselves and they do not wish to comply with the rules in place to recieve assistance. Paying this class of person would serve absolutely no benefit to society. There would be no gain but actually a loss to expendable cash for the remainder of society. It wold cost additional money to support a program as you suggest which would require greater taxes on those working which means less disposable income for those paying for your system.

    So, should we understand that your great endevour to alter society to benefit only those that choose to not work indicates that you yourself are homeless or unemployed?

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