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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    8,141

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting budwad
    View Post
    In an apartment complex, every apartment has its own mailbox. The same is true for condominiums. A landlord renting out rooms or apartments is also required to provide a separate mailbox for each tenant.
    Can you point the exact rule in your link that says that? I read through it and found nothing that states that each tenant in an apartment building or shared living situation MUST have a separate mailbox.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3,201

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting PayrolGuy
    View Post
    Simple he gives the POB as his address when he is filling things out.
    A person use to have to give a street address when getting a P.O.Box. The OP would also have to do an Address Change with current mail.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    2,605

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting PayrolGuy
    View Post
    We have no reason to think . . .
    . . . anything because the OP hasn't seen fit to return to this thread and clarify the facts.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Both are doable. MANY people do it. And you can do an address change for just one person in the house. I did it after I graduated high school.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    427

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting budwad
    View Post
    No one can put mail (or anything else) into a mailbox except a USPS postal worker.
    I have to disagree with that my board friend. I can leave a letter in a persons home mailbox or any such mail receptacle as long as I have affixed proper postage. No postage, then it becomes a criminal offense.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3,201

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting RJR
    View Post
    I have to disagree with that my board friend. I can leave a letter in a persons home mailbox or any such mail receptacle as long as I have affixed proper postage. No postage, then it becomes a criminal offense.
    Oh well. I have used my mailbox for leaving notes and other things for friends and family if I am not home. No one has ever said a word, including postal delivery people.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    427

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting Mercy&Grace
    View Post
    Oh well. I have used my mailbox for leaving notes and other things for friends and family if I am not home. No one has ever said a word, including postal delivery people.
    I suppose it is one of those violations that is no big deal to a mail carrier, even if they knew.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7,001

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
    View Post
    Can you point the exact rule in your link that says that? I read through it and found nothing that states that each tenant in an apartment building or shared living situation MUST have a separate mailbox.
    You can spend a few days going through all the postal regulations. One regulation links you to another and so on. But here is what the postal commission says about new or renovated properties.

    https://about.usps.com/what-we-are-d...ders-guide.pdf

    One last comment on mail box ownership. While you may own your mail box it is under the control of the federal government once it is approved. Therefore, it really doesn't matter who owns it.

    18 U.S. Code § 1705. Destruction of letter boxes or mail
    U.S. Code
    Notes
    Whoever willfully or maliciously injures, tears down or destroys any letter box or other receptacle intended or used for the receipt or delivery of mail on any mail route, or breaks open the same or willfully or maliciously injures, defaces or destroys any mail deposited therein, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.

    (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 779; May 24, 1949, ch. 139, § 38, 63 Stat. 95; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII, § 330016(1)(H), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147; Pub. L. 107–273, div. B, title III, § 3002(a)(2), Nov. 2, 2002, 116 Stat. 1805.)
    Quote Quoting RJR
    View Post
    I have to disagree with that my board friend. I can leave a letter in a persons home mailbox or any such mail receptacle as long as I have affixed proper postage. No postage, then it becomes a criminal offense.
    Don't forget to cancel the stamp and initial it. But that seems a pretty silly thing to do when if you have mail pick-up you just let the carrier take it.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    620

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
    View Post
    No Harold, the problem is that you don't really understand property law. Ownership carries with it a whole bundle of rights. If you don't have that bundle of rights you don't own it or effectively own it. Among the most important property rights are the rights to sell or lease the property, the right to destroy the property and, for personal goods, the right to take possession of it and move it around. The mailbox on my house is not owned by the USPS, nor does it effectively own it. Why? Because it lacks those important rights in the mailbox. The USPS cannot sell my mailbox. The USPS cannot lease my mailbox to someone else. The USPS cannot come to the house and remove the mailbox, destroy it, or move it someplace else. Because it lacks some very significant rights that an owner would have it clearly is not effectively the owner of it.

    What can the USPS do? It can tell me that if I want to get mail my mailbox must meet the requirements specified in the postal regulations. That does not make the USPS the owner of mailbox any more than the city telling me my home must meet certain building code requirements would make the city the effective owner of my home. The USPS can also refer to the DOJ cases for prosecution if someone were to grab the mail out of my box and destroy my mail or were to open my mail without authorization. But that also does not make the USPS an effective owner of the mailbox any more than the city would be an effective owner for prosecuting someone for vandalizing my mailbox.

    If you want your mail, you need to make your mailbox meet USPS standards. If you don't want to get convicted of a crime, don't take someone else's mail. But while federal law covers those sorts of things, they don't provide the USPS with anything close to the bundle of rights in the mailbox that an owner would have.

    You can say you're not having it all you want. But that doesn't change the fact that you clearly overstated matters when you said that all mailboxes are owned by the USPS. And even coming back to amend your answer to the USPS being the "effective owner" fails for the reasons I just described.

    Just because the USPS doesn't own my mailbox and isn't the effective owner of it doesn't mean that it doesn't have rules that impact my mailbox. Clearly it does. Had you just limited yourself to saying that federal law does prevent the homeowner in this case from stealing or destroying the OP's mail I would not have had a problem with that. However, that's not what the homeowner is doing. The homeowner is taking the mail from the box and distributing it to residents himself rather than letting them access the mailbox to get their mail. Whether the homeowner is within his rights to do that depends on the answers to the questions I asked earlier.
    Having absolute control over something is effectively owning it. A rental car is effectively owned by the renter. A prisoner is effectively owned by the prison system. If not, please define 'effectively owned.' ...And I am not even asking you to offer a definition of the term in other tenses which would be suitable as well. But, I'd imagine that if I quoted a few Webster examples of 'owned' you'd challenge those too.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: Banned from Mailbox

    Quote Quoting Harold99
    View Post
    Having absolute control over something is effectively owning it. A rental car is effectively owned by the renter. A prisoner is effectively owned by the prison system.
    own·er·ship
    /ˈōnərˌSHip/
    noun
    noun: ownership; plural noun: ownerships
    the act, state, or right of possessing something.
    "the ownership of land"

    The USPS has no right to take my mailbox. I am free to take my mailbox and do what I want with it including destroying it. The USPS does not have that right.

    Does your state "own" your car? They have some significant legal control over how you use it?

    Did the Federal government own the airplane I used? They have the right to tell me how I can and can't use it. They had the power to tell me who could work on it.

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