My question involves insurance law for the state of: Georgia

We are in a tricky situation. My father passed away recently. My sister continues to live in his home, which he left to her in his will. We filed his will with the probate office and received letters testamentary, but the estate is not closed yet. There is a reverse mortgage on the home, which my sister has listed for sale in accordance with the lender's terms. Her time will be up in March and she plans to vacate it at that time. During this time, the home of course must have continued insurance.

We did not think to notify Dad's insurance agent when he passed, but when a bill came due recently, we explained that he had died, and we asked her to change his name to my sister's and to change his address from his now-closed p.o. box. We didn't realize that things don't work that way. The agent cancelled Dad's policy and began paperwork for a new policy for my sister. Here's where things got sticky. After all the papers were signed, a payment made, and she was told the policy was approved, things took a turn. The agent, who did not cash the check, called to say their new computer system seems to have a glitch. It rejected the policy. She cannot understand the problem and has spent many hours with tech support but now she is giving up. She hates to lose our business and is disappointed about letting our Dad down, but she cannot overcome the technical issue. The policy she wrote my sister will expire next week.

The reverse mortgage company has been in contact with the agent and officially informed my sister that they will foreclose if a new policy doesn't pick up immediately. We started shopping for new agents but discovered that because the home's roof is over 20 years old and we will have trouble finding full coverage.

The roof evidently wasn't a factor in continuing Dad's coverage while he was alive. So here are my questions:
Should the policy have been continued under the auspices of Dad's estate, until the estate is closed in a few months? Or would the estate have had to purchase a new policy until the court procedures are completed, and the aged roof would have presented the same obstacle as now? Would it be even more difficult to get a policy in the name of the estate, as opposed to the name of the inheritor?

If the best we can get is a limited policy due to the aged roof, I am worried that the mortgage company won't accept that and will foreclose. Was/is there any remedy for this complication? We are panicked.

Crisis averted. She got insurance. The roof wasn't an issue with her new company. I'm still curious about these questions, and I don't know why the roof is an issue with some and not others, but I'm happy that it's no longer a pressing issue. I would delete the thread but I don't know how.

The following post was meant as a follow-up, but it posted as an edit inside the original post. I would delete all of it if I knew how.

"Crisis averted. She got insurance. The roof wasn't an issue with her new company. I'm still curious about these questions, and I don't know why the roof is an issue with some and not others, but I'm happy that it's no longer a pressing issue. I would delete the thread but I don't know how."