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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    6

    Default Attorney

    I'm in the state of NC. Can anyone please tell me how appellant attorneys work?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    19,195

    Default Re: Attorney

    That's a bit nebulous.
    Generally, as with any attorney, you enter a contract for them to work for you and you agree to pay them.

    Do you want to clarify what you are asking?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Attorney

    This guy has appointed me to be his POA. I was skeptical as to if I really wanted to do this. He is a friend of my son who will soon be going to prison himself soon. He had no one to help him other than his Dad. He has the early signs of dementia. After talking with his father I think I will bow out of this one. There is no mention of monies. Do they think I'm going to pay just because I'm his POA. I don't think so. I feel sorry for him but I can't help him. As they say "if you do the crime" you do the time". Thanks so much for your input.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    19,195

    Default Re: Attorney

    Being named the attorney-in-fact authorizes you to act, but doesn't require you to act. Pay what? What does this have to do with either plea bargains or appeals?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,638

    Default Re: Attorney

    Quote Quoting BYFAITH
    View Post
    I'm in the state of NC. Can anyone please tell me how appellant attorneys work?
    First of all, I assume you meant "appellate," not "appellant." Second, the question is hopelessly vague. Most attorneys work by sitting behind desks reading, writing and researching things and, on occasion, going to a courtroom, but I doubt that's really what you wanted to know.

    Quote Quoting BYFAITH
    View Post
    This guy has appointed me to be his POA.
    No he didn't. "POA" is an acronym that stands for power of attorney. A power of attorney is a document by which one person (the principal) gives another person (the agent or attorney-in-fact) authority to deal with third-persons on behalf of the principal. Needless to say, you cannot be appointed to be a document.

    In any event, your follow up post did not clarify what the question in your original post meant.

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