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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    1

    Default If You Marry in Another Country is it Valid in the USA

    My question involves marriage law for the state of: Arizona.

    I'm planning on marrying a girl in another country (Guyana) and going to live over there. (This is a real marriage, and we both love each other). We have decided we will stay over there.

    Given we ever split up, will my marriage be valid in the US? Will I have to go through the divorce process in the US or only in Guyana? If we divorced, would I have to pay alimony from the US to Guyana?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,657

    Default Re: If I Marry Out of the U.S. a, is It Valid Here in the USA

    Yes the US will recognize the marriage assuming it is recognized in Guyana. Alimony and if you have to pay it will be dictated by the law and the circumstances where and when you divorce.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    7,090

    Default Re: If I Marry Out of the U.S. a, is It Valid Here in the USA

    Quote Quoting 458wolfie
    View Post
    My question involves marriage law for the state of: Arizona.
    Given we ever split up, will my marriage be valid in the US? Will I have to go through the divorce process in the US or only in Guyana? If we divorced, would I have to pay alimony from the US to Guyana?
    The basic rule in the U.S. is that states recognize foreign marriages as long as those marriages do not violate the public policy of the state. Thus, bigamous and polygamous marriages would not be recognized, for example. It is also the general rule that states will recognize foreign divorces, too. You would not have to get a divorce from the U.S. if you got it in Guyana. The court in the jurisdiction where the divorce is obtained would determine issues of property division, alimony, etc.

    If you are a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident bear in mind you will still have to file federal income tax returns with the IRS to pay tax on your income. The U.S. taxes its citizens and residents on their worldwide income.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,067

    Default Re: If I Marry Out of the U.S. a, is It Valid Here in the USA

    Quote Quoting 458wolfie
    View Post
    I'm planning on marrying a girl in another country (Guyana) and going to live over there. (This is a real marriage, and we both love each other). We have decided we will stay over there.

    Given we ever split up, will my marriage be valid in the US?
    Yes. If you marry in accordance with the laws of any other country, the marriage will be valid in the U.S.


    Quote Quoting 458wolfie
    View Post
    Will I have to go through the divorce process in the US or only in Guyana?
    If you get divorced in accordance with Guyanese law, the divorce will be valid in the U.S. If you move to the U.S. without divorcing in Guyana and want to terminate the marriage, then you'll have to get divorced in the U.S.


    Quote Quoting 458wolfie
    View Post
    If we divorced, would I have to pay alimony from the US to Guyana?
    We have no conceivable way of predicting this beyond the following:

    If you divorce in Guyana, then the question will be whether the Guyanese court will order one of you to pay alimony to the other. I have no idea if that's possible under Guyanese law.

    If you divorce in Guyana and the Guyanese court orders you to pay alimony and you then move to the U.S., you'll still be bound by the Guyanese court's order. If you disregard the order, then your ex-wife could seek to enforce that order against you in the U.S. It will be expensive to do this.

    If you divorce in the U.S., then the U.S. court may or may not order one of you to pay alimony to the other depending on the relevant factors under the laws of the U.S. state where the divorce occurs.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    15,121

    Default Re: If I Marry Out of the U.S. a, is It Valid Here in the USA

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
    View Post
    The basic rule in the U.S. is that states recognize foreign marriages as long as those marriages do not violate the public policy of the state. Thus, bigamous and polygamous marriages would not be recognized, for example. It is also the general rule that states will recognize foreign divorces, too. You would not have to get a divorce from the U.S. if you got it in Guyana. The court in the jurisdiction where the divorce is obtained would determine issues of property division, alimony, etc.

    If you are a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident bear in mind you will still have to file federal income tax returns with the IRS to pay tax on your income. The U.S. taxes its citizens and residents on their worldwide income.

    But, there is a foreign income exclusion that would exclude the first 100k or so from US tax, and there is also a foreign tax credit so you may have to file a tax return, but not actually owe any tax.

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