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  1. #11

    Default Re: Arrest Rights of Convicts

    The responses to my question overall are very peculiar.
    When someone passes out in a bar and someone picks them up and drags them out, this is abduction. It is known to lead to personal injury of the individual already impaired. Kidnapping is illegal. The abductee merely needs to be a legal idiot for it to be legal. I understand felons to be legal idiots under police scrutiny, in all cases - is this not true? I guess my question is stuck in my head b/c it is clear from the case that I have referred to in another thread, that anyone faces felony if police looking for them due to a complaint by an admitted criminal in a matter (or anyone at all) find them inside private property and they get righteous and tell the cops nothing. But if you're sure a convict is the same as a citizen under standard procedures, then I will progress to the threads on handling matters that way.

    I do not understand all the asides and misdirections of this thread. Is it such a puny issue that there is no interest? Seems like no imagination. Are we to understand that a 911 call from a residential landline the police know to be a private property in good standing has no legal rights beyond that of a caller on voip app demanding emergency response to an abandoned crack house? I have been instructed otherwise relating to public pay phones on property in good standing.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    19,203

    Default Re: Arrest Rights of Convicts

    You've still not provided details for us to make anything other that conjecture. If this man has drunk sufficiently in a bar to pass out, one would assume he is intoxicated. Intoxicated in a public place is an arrestable crime. The fact that a bar is private property doesn't change this. A public place for this purpose in Iowa law is any place that the public can enter without needing to ask for permission for entry. No complaint by the owner or anybody else is necessary for this.

    Anybody can be scrutinized by the police. Especially, if they are committing or are suspected of committing crimes. We call that "good police work."

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,656

    Default Re: Arrest Rights of Convicts

    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
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    The responses to my question overall are very peculiar.
    How so?


    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
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    When someone passes out in a bar and someone picks them up and drags them out, this is abduction.
    Huh? As I explained previously, one online dictionary defines "abduct" as follows: "to carry off or lead away (a person) illegally and in secret or by force, especially to kidnap." Simply dragging a passed out person out of a bar (whether the passing out was alcohol induced or otherwise) is not illegal or in secret or by force.


    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
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    It is known to lead to personal injury of the individual already impaired.
    The action you described could lead to injury, but probably would not in most cases.


    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
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    The abductee merely needs to be a legal idiot for it to be legal. I understand felons to be legal idiots under police scrutiny, in all cases - is this not true?
    The term "legal idiot" is not a term that has any accepted meaning in any state.


    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
    View Post
    I guess my question is stuck in my head b/c it is clear from the case that I have referred to in another thread, that anyone faces felony if police looking for them due to a complaint by an admitted criminal in a matter (or anyone at all) find them inside private property and they get righteous and tell the cops nothing.
    While these are all common English language words, this sentence/question is largely incoherent. Also, I have no idea what "case" or "other thread" you're talking about. Perhaps you should pose your question in that other thread.


    Quote Quoting Cymulacra
    View Post
    I do not understand all the asides and misdirections of this thread. Is it such a puny issue that there is no interest?
    I can't speak for anyone else who responded, but my prior response in this thread explained clearly that your question wasn't susceptible of a direct response because of the wording you chose and because you provided no factual context at all.

    I would suggest that you look to see if any local community college or adult education facility near you offers remedial English classes.

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