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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    20,287

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    Quote Quoting jhceres
    View Post
    You dont need a certificate or document to see that most not all but most cops retired or not have a less than avarage I Q
    At best just avarage .
    I was merely asking for a citation ... you know ... some objective and reliable source for your claim? Your lack of any proof of your misguided contention simply reinforces my confidence that you possess NO such source. (Hint: Your claptrap of a claim is not at all true.)
    **********
    Retired Cal Cop Sergeant & Teacher

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Ceres ca
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    Never heard of your "mensa group" sorry

    Miller v. .u.s. 230 f 2d 486, 489
    Treveling is a constitutional right, keep that in mind when you look up miller v u.s.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    15,216

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    Quote Quoting jhceres
    View Post
    Never heard of your "mensa group" sorry

    Miller v. .u.s. 230 f 2d 486, 489
    Treveling is a constitutional right, keep that in mind when you look up miller v u.s.
    That case:

    https://law.justia.com/cases/federal...30/486/232145/


    Has absolutely nothing to do with traveling or roadways.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    23,869

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    The fact that you have never heard of Mensa rather proves Mark's and Carl's point...

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Ceres ca
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    That case is all about your right to travel .
    A right can not be turned into a crime
    How much more clear can you get
    Done with dicussion .

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    7,600

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    In my best Curly Bill impression: Well...bye.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    47.606 N 122.332 W in body, still at 90 S in my mind.
    Posts
    1,366

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    Quote Quoting jhceres
    View Post
    That case is all about your right to travel .
    A right can not be turned into a crime
    How much more clear can you get
    Done with dicussion .
    Well you just go and travel on down the road.
    "Where do those stairs go?"
    "They go up!"

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Paso Robles, California
    Posts
    483

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Publjc Roadway

    Police powers are the fundamental right of a government to make all necessary laws. In the United States, state police power comes from the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, which gives states the rights and powers "not delegated to the United States." States are thus granted the power to establish and enforce laws protecting the welfare, safety, and health of the public.

    Police power is exercised by the legislative and executive branches of the various states through the enactment and enforcement of laws. States have the power to compel obedience to these laws through whatever measures they see fit, provided these measures do not infringe upon any of the rights protected by the United States Constitution or in the various state constitutions, and are not unreasonably arbitrary or oppressive. Methods of enforcement can include legal sanctions, physical means, and other forms of coercion and inducement. Controversies over the exercise of state police power can arise when exercise by state authorities conflicts with individual rights and freedoms.
    The right of states to make laws governing safety, health, welfare, and morals is derived from the Tenth Amendment, which states, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." State legislatures exercise their police power by enacting statutes, and they also delegate much of their police power to counties, cities, towns, villages, and large boroughs within the state.

    Police power does not specifically refer to the right of state and local government to create police forces, although the police power does include that right. Police power is also used as the basis for enacting a variety of substantive laws in such areas as Zoning, land use, fire and Building Codes, gambling, discrimination, parking, crime, licensing of professionals, liquor, motor vehicles, bicycles, nuisances, schooling, and sanitation.

    Cases:
    Hendrick v. Maryland 235 U.S. 610 (1915)
    "The movement of motor vehicles over highways, being attended by constant and serious dangers to the public and also being abnormally destructive to the highways, is a proper subject of police regulation by the state.
    In the absence of national legislation covering the subject, a state may prescribe uniform regulations necessary for safety and order in respect to operation of motor vehicles on its highways, including those moving in interstate commerce."


    Hess v. Pawloski 274 US 352 (1927)
    "Motor vehicles are dangerous machines; and, even when skillfully and carefully operated, their use is attended by serious dangers to persons and property. In the public interest the State may make and enforce regulations reasonably calculated to promote care on the part of all, residents and non-residents alike, who use its highways."


    Reitz v. Mealey 314 US 33 (1941)
    "The use of the public highways by motor vehicles, with its consequent dangers, renders the reasonableness and necessity of regulation apparent. The universal practice is to register ownership of automobiles and to license their drivers. Any appropriate means adopted by the states to insure competence and care on the part of its licensees and to protect others using the highway is consonant with due process."
    *****
    I may not always be right, but I am never wrong.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    15,216

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Publjc Roadway

    Thanks for posting that Jim. It sums up things quite nicely.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Paso Robles, California
    Posts
    483

    Default Re: You Don't Need a Drivers License to Travel on Public Roadway

    Quote Quoting jhceres
    View Post
    No its you big government people that are clueless,
    You dont need a license to drive in any state
    Just becouse someone ssys you have to doesnt mean its true no matter how many people fall for it
    Police powers are the fundamental right of a government to make all necessary laws. In the United States, state police power comes from the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, which gives states the rights and powers "not delegated to the United States." States are thus granted the power to establish and enforce laws protecting the welfare, safety, and health of the public.

    Police power is exercised by the legislative and executive branches of the various states through the enactment and enforcement of laws. States have the power to compel obedience to these laws through whatever measures they see fit, provided these measures do not infringe upon any of the rights protected by the United States Constitution or in the various state constitutions, and are not unreasonably arbitrary or oppressive. Methods of enforcement can include legal sanctions, physical means, and other forms of coercion and inducement. Controversies over the exercise of state police power can arise when exercise by state authorities conflicts with individual rights and freedoms.
    The right of states to make laws governing safety, health, welfare, and morals is derived from the Tenth Amendment, which states, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." State legislatures exercise their police power by enacting statutes, and they also delegate much of their police power to counties, cities, towns, villages, and large boroughs within the state.

    Police power does not specifically refer to the right of state and local government to create police forces, although the police power does include that right. Police power is also used as the basis for enacting a variety of substantive laws in such areas as Zoning, land use, fire and Building Codes, gambling, discrimination, parking, crime, licensing of professionals, liquor, motor vehicles, bicycles, nuisances, schooling, and sanitation.

    Cases:
    Hendrick v. Maryland 235 U.S. 610 (1915)
    "The movement of motor vehicles over highways, being attended by constant and serious dangers to the public and also being abnormally destructive to the highways, is a proper subject of police regulation by the state.
    In the absence of national legislation covering the subject, a state may prescribe uniform regulations necessary for safety and order in respect to operation of motor vehicles on its highways, including those moving in interstate commerce."


    Hess v. Pawloski 274 US 352 (1927)
    "Motor vehicles are dangerous machines; and, even when skillfully and carefully operated, their use is attended by serious dangers to persons and property. In the public interest the State may make and enforce regulations reasonably calculated to promote care on the part of all, residents and non-residents alike, who use its highways."


    Reitz v. Mealey 314 US 33 (1941)
    "The use of the public highways by motor vehicles, with its consequent dangers, renders the reasonableness and necessity of regulation apparent. The universal practice is to register ownership of automobiles and to license their drivers. Any appropriate means adopted by the states to insure competence and care on the part of its licensees and to protect others using the highway is consonant with due process."
    *****
    I may not always be right, but I am never wrong.

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