Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    1,289

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    What wasn't revealed online is that only one person who lived out-of-county has ever been admitted into the program due to the highly competitive nature of the program, which also wasn't mentioned online.
    Why would you expect that to be mentioned or disclosed? Also, are you suggesting the "highly competitive nature of the program" disproportionately impacts out-of-county residents? Why would that be the case?

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    Even though nothing I was told was technically false, I feel scammed.
    What does "technically false" mean? Don't you simply mean that "nothing [you] were told was false"? Why do you "feel scammed"?

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    No one at the college gave me any indication that entry into this program would be essentially impossible for me
    But it wasn't impossible, right? You told us that you "declared [your] major, signed up for the program, met with a counselor, and registered for classes that fulfilled the program's requirements." Am I missing something? How can you reconcile your statement that you "signed up for the program" with your subsequent statement that you "never applied"?

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    My mom sent an email to the college expressing my concerns
    Your mom did this? You're an adult, right?

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    Is there anything I can do about this?
    I'm sure you can do lots of things. If your intent was to ask if you have any basis for a lawsuit, no such basis appears in your post.

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    That’s not what I’m upset about. I’m upset that I, along with a lot of other students, spent hundreds of dollars and made major life decisions based on incomplete information that wasn’t readily available.
    Because you "never applied," you cannot prove that you wouldn't have been accepted if you had applied. Also, having been told that in-county residents get preference, it became your burden to inquire what the meant as a practical matter.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting pg1067
    View Post
    Why would you expect that to be mentioned or disclosed? Also, are you suggesting the "highly competitive nature of the program" disproportionately impacts out-of-county residents? Why would that be the case?



    What does "technically false" mean? Don't you simply mean that "nothing [you] were told was false"? Why do you "feel scammed"?



    But it wasn't impossible, right? You told us that you "declared [your] major, signed up for the program, met with a counselor, and registered for classes that fulfilled the program's requirements." Am I missing something? How can you reconcile your statement that you "signed up for the program" with your subsequent statement that you "never applied"?

    i si

    Your mom did this? You're an adult, right?



    I'm sure you can do lots of things. If your intent was to ask if you have any basis for a lawsuit, no such basis appears in your post.
    I signed up in that I declared my major as such and signed up for the information session a few months in advance. I never applied for acceptance.

    Technically false means: Online it says there is a preferene for in-county students. In reality, so many people apply that it is impossible for anyone who lives out-of-county to get in. The word ďtechnicallyĒ is used because while technically a ďpreferenceĒ, itís a lot more than a preference; itís a requirement.

    Thank you for your consideration.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    47.606 N 122.332 W in body, still at 90 S in my mind.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Also, I wasn’t selected because I never applied. However, I shaped my life around the false belief that I had an actual chance of entry. The college took my money and let me declare a major that I had virtually no chance of successfully studying at the school.
    If you didn't apply how could you have possibly enrolled in the classes? If you didn't apply how can you possibly look for a legal remedy to a problem that doesn't exist?

    You say that you didn't have enough info to withdraw (for classes that you shouldn't have been a able to register for in a program you never applied for) but you did. You stated in your first post that you were informed that in-county applicants will get preference over in-state. You said this is clearly stated in the schools website. Given that refunds for tuition are available within the first 10 days or so of classes how is it that you didn't figure out that the program is full?

    There seem to be some glaring holes that would've been filled in by some simple questions that you could've asked very early on.

    As stated above, a letter to the program administrators/college administration may help you out but don't count on it. There are many, many disgruntled CC students out there who feel like their getting screwed due to a lack of due diligence on their part.

    Additionally, it doesn't appear that you really have legal remedy to your complaint. It doesn't seem that you were wronged, in the legal sense, you were provided with all of the information that you needed and the means to get any more that you wanted.
    "Where do those stairs go?"
    "They go up!"

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting Mark47n
    View Post
    If you didn't apply how could you have possibly enrolled in the classes? If you didn't apply how can you possibly look for a legal remedy to a problem that doesn't exist?

    You say that you didn't have enough info to withdraw (for classes that you shouldn't have been a able to register for in a program you never applied for) but you did. You stated in your first post that you were informed that in-county applicants will get preference over in-state. You said this is clearly stated in the schools website. Given that refunds for tuition are available within the first 10 days or so of classes how is it that you didn't figure out that the program is full?

    There seem to be some glaring holes that would've been filled in by some simple questions that you could've asked very early on.

    As stated above, a letter to the program administrators/college administration may help you out but don't count on it. There are many, many disgruntled CC students out there who feel like their getting screwed due to a lack of due diligence on their part.

    Additionally, it doesn't appear that you really have legal remedy to your complaint. It doesn't seem that you were wronged, in the legal sense, you were provided with all of the information that you needed and the means to get any more that you wanted.
    I applied to the college, not the program. The classes I registered for werenít part of the program, they were requisite classes for applicatiom into the program.

    I didnít know the program was full because they did not hold the information session until after the withdraw date was over. There was information given at that session that was not given online.

    Thank you for your time

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting EJay
    View Post
    Also, I would look into their policy as to what qualifies as an "in-county" student. If you are currently commuting from out out county, perhaps getting an apartment for a year or two near campus is an additional option. Who knows you might even be able to find a job at a nearby dental office to help pay for the apartment.

    What school is it?
    Howard Community College. Thatís not a bad idea, but at this point, I donít want anything to do with the college anymore. Iíll be okay. I have enough high-level math credits that I might be able to get a math degree soon at another college. Thank you so much for being so kind.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,112

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    at least on some states, the CCs are partially funded by local property taxes based on people who actually live in the county and who use those specific schools. I seem to remember our local one also charges more for students that are "out of county". Therefore they give preference to in county residents and those that might have paid into the property taxes that help fund them. I have to agree if you want to be admitted, it might be helpful to move into the county (and the CC had no way of knowing you weren't planning to do so prior to being admitted to the specific program unless the residency has some sort of minimum time restraint)

    Since you didn't apply for admittance to the program, you have no way of knowing that you 100% would not have been accepted. As the parent of a child who is attending a major university out of state that is very competitive and has a low % of out of state students, we knew paying the application fee etc that we had a lower chance, but we still tried...and in the end he did get in.... Here's a statistic that is 100% true --> 100% of those that don't apply, don't get admitted....

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    47.606 N 122.332 W in body, still at 90 S in my mind.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting Ara
    View Post
    I applied to the college, not the program. The classes I registered for weren’t part of the program, they were requisite classes for applicatiom into the program.

    I didn’t know the program was full because they did not hold the information session until after the withdraw date was over. There was information given at that session that was not given online.

    Thank you for your time
    The you definitely have no legal option.

    Again, if you never applied for the program (whatever the reason) you have no cause to sue. When the info session is immaterial. You knew the in-county received preference and you could've taken your chances but, instead you chose not to apply. This choice is a key component...not the you'd likely have cause if you did and weren't accepted due to enrollment of in-county.

    I'd call this a lesson learned in due diligence.
    "Where do those stairs go?"
    "They go up!"

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    The OP didn't apply for the program so he doesn't KNOW that he wouldn't have been accepted.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    47.606 N 122.332 W in body, still at 90 S in my mind.
    Posts
    1,368

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting EJay
    View Post
    https://www.howardcc.edu/admissions-...all%202019.pdf

    That's a pretty easy requirement to meet. The application deadline is January 15. You still have time to establish residency for this year. If you want to do math, then by all means do that but don't let little policy things get in the way of what your goals are.

    BTW my experience with these types of things is you include a utility bill and your ID in your application and you are given priority, it is often rare to see them look into it deeply. Rent a room from someone, change your ID address and put one of the utilities in your name.

    With the dental hygiene program it seems as though space is quite limited. They want to accept only dedicated, serious individuals they are confident will succeed in the program and go on to work in a dental office. If this is you, and you show this to them, you'll be accepted.
    You're missing the point. The OP is upset but feeling misled. The OP is not asking how to establish residency.
    "Where do those stairs go?"
    "They go up!"

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: Misleading Advertising on the Part of a College

    Quote Quoting EJay
    View Post
    If you read my other posts you would know the point was not missed. Considering multiple people have told her she has no legal recourse (you were the 5th one to do so), I think the point has been drilled into her hard enough. So to add to the discussion and offer the OP an alternative solution she could actually accomplish, I did a bit of research and found that residency may be easier to establish than she thinks. Not sure why it is necessary to criticize my response.
    But the OP has stated he is no longer interested in the program.

    1. Sponsored Links
       

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Disability Benefits: Can You Get SSI if Working Part-Time and Taking College Classes
    By Isthislegal in forum Social Security Law
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-10-2015, 04:28 PM
  2. Termination of Support: Emancipation of Part Time New Jersey College Student
    By Mikalle in forum Child Custody, Support and Visitation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-20-2013, 03:15 PM
  3. Online Services: Can Your Website URL Be Considered False or Misleading Advertising
    By truemountain in forum Consumer Law
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-07-2013, 05:34 PM
  4. Part Time College Attendance and Child Support
    By mansupport in forum Child Custody, Support and Visitation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-16-2009, 04:15 PM
 
 
Sponsored Links

Legal Help, Information and Resources