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  1. #41
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Interesting about that implication, that is on the streets in Dallas and coming from the home team.

    If she weren't a cop she probably wouldn't have left the scene and would have had a bond hearing for a staggering amount in line with at least a second-degree charge.

    The "over under 10" game?

    Under for sure and maybe even probation.

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
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    Have you lived in an apartment building in which every floor looks exactly the same? If not, you are unfamiliar with how easy it can be to confuse someone else's unit with your own. I have lived in several such buildings. And I too have had the experience of unknowingly getting off at the wrong floor (in my case the elevator unexpectedly opened at a floor below mine) and simply walking the familiar path to what I thought was my unit. My apartment number was on the door, but I never look at the apartment number — why should I, I know my apartment location after all. So I tried to put the key in the lock to open it. It was only when the key didn't slide in easily that I realized something was wrong, looked at the door number, and I realized I was one floor below. So this is a mistake that is easier to make than you might think.

    Now, of course had I opened the door I would have instantly seen it wasnt my place and if it was dark the first thing I would have done is hit the lights. Even if someone was there, I would have hit the lights so I could see what I was dealing with. Going in dark is dangerous, IMO. So my issue, given the facts we know so far, is why she didn't hit the lights when she entered. I also wonder why, when the door was unlocked (which it should not have been if it was her place) she wouldn't first look at the apartment number on the door, just like I did when I found the key didn't go in as easily as it should have. Once you see something is wrong with the door the first instinct should be to ensure you do in fact have the right door.
    Why wouldn’t she look at the number when the door was open?

    my best guess is she never questioned it being her apartment. Her first thought was likely somebody broke in. As you said, why look at the number when you know you’re at your apartment.


    Why nof turn on the lights? Because if she was in the dark or low level light it makes it more difficult for a person with a gun to see her well enough to shoot her. Why do you think cops blind you with their headlights and spotlights when they pull you over? If lights up the car but it also gives them coverage. Same thing with a brilliantly bright flashlight. It makes the user harder to see.

    So rather than turning on the lights, why didn’t she use her flashlight. Again, my guess is things moved too quickly to do so.

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
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    Have you lived in an apartment building in which every floor looks exactly the same? If not, you are unfamiliar with how easy it can be to confuse someone else's unit with your own. I have lived in several such buildings. And I too have had the experience of unknowingly getting off at the wrong floor (in my case the elevator unexpectedly opened at a floor below mine) and simply walking the familiar path to what I thought was my unit. My apartment number was on the door, but I never look at the apartment number — why should I, I know my apartment location after all. So I tried to put the key in the lock to open it. It was only when the key didn't slide in easily that I realized something was wrong, looked at the door number, and I realized I was one floor below. So this is a mistake that is easier to make than you might think.

    Now, of course had I opened the door I would have instantly seen it wasnt my place and if it was dark the first thing I would have done is hit the lights. Even if someone was there, I would have hit the lights so I could see what I was dealing with. Going in dark is dangerous, IMO. So my issue, given the facts we know so far, is why she didn't hit the lights when she entered. I also wonder why, when the door was unlocked (which it should not have been if it was her place) she wouldn't first look at the apartment number on the door, just like I did when I found the key didn't go in as easily as it should have. Once you see something is wrong with the door the first instinct should be to ensure you do in fact have the right door.
    Why wouldn’t she look at the number when the door was open?

    my best guess is she never questioned it being her apartment. Her first thought was likely somebody broke in. As you said, why look at the number when you know you’re at your apartment.


    Why nof turn on the lights? Because if she was in the dark or low level light it makes it more difficult for a person with a gun to see her well enough to shoot her. Why do you think cops blind you with their headlights and spotlights when they pull you over? If lights up the car but it also gives them coverage. Same thing with a brilliantly bright flashlight. It makes the user harder to see.

    So rather than turning on the lights, why didn’t she use her flashlight. Again, my guess is things moved too quickly to do so.

  3. #43
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting KK1968
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    Interesting about that implication, that is on the streets in Dallas and coming from the home team.

    If she weren't a cop she probably wouldn't have left the scene and would have had a bond hearing for a staggering amount in line with at least a second-degree charge.

    The "over under 10" game?

    Under for sure and maybe even probation.
    I think probation will be off the table...
    I'm not a lawyer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.......

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting KK1968
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    Let's assume the drive to the wrong parking level was identical and unmarked then start at the front door that had the WRONG number on it.

    There is the start of ZERO chance.



    According to HER.

    Now we are to believe he was standing in his apartment identical to hers with the lights off and the door unlocked and/or open.

    Maybe his lightswitch was in a different place than hers and her flashlight was left at the station with her body cam!?

    So he's standing there in the dark with door unlocked doing what, baiting her to come in and shoot him?

    That conniving and scheming decendant!

    I don't believe her and probably never will.

    She knows enough about the law to have an idea what she better not say and what she better claim is the truth that likely nobody can dispute.
    yes, According to her. Do you have another witness? Without another witness it becomes very difficult to overcome her statement if it is plausible.

    remember, the state has to prove its case behind all reasonable doubt. If she puts forth a plausible argument against manslaughter she may walk

    Manslaughter in Texas is codified under Texas Penal Code Chapter 19.04(a) and is committed when someone “recklessly causes the death of an individual.” Manslaughter is a 2nd Degree Felony (2 to 20 years in the Texas Department of Corrections).
    The legal definition for reckless is defined by Tex.Pen.C. 6.03(c). That provision states, ” A person acts recklessly, or is reckless, with respect to circumstances surrounding his conduct or the result of his conduct when he is aware of but consciously disregards a substantial and unjustifiable risk that the circumstances exist or the result will occur. The risk must be of such a nature and degree that its disregard constitutes a gross deviation from the standard of care that an ordinary person would exercise under all the circumstances as viewed from the actor’s standpoint.”
    it doesn’t even sound like manslaughter to me. Don’t get me wrong. I believe it is a tragic event and somebody died that didn’t deserve it but it may be she actually walks from this unless the state can prove her actions were reckless. So far I don’t see them as being reckless.


    And the lightswitches are likely to be in the exact same place as her apartment if the units are identical. Without question it is near the latch side of the door within a foot or so or if the door opens. Against a wall just beyond where the end of the door comes to on the wall

    there are both legal requirements of where light switches must be for a room and architects are creatures of habit and that is where they place them, habitually


    Quote Quoting KK1968
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    Her bail was 300,000 and so that would mean she'd need 30K and maybe change to get out.

    Who knows, she may be like a gal or two I know that any number of bondsmen would spring with no cash required and in an instant, put in an apartment or so, and maybe for no particular reason at all.

    Conspiracy???

    It all stinks of BS.
    I know somebody that bought a $125,000 house cash at that age.
    Remember, we worked 15 hours. That suggests she puts in a lot of time at her job. If she she could be making some decent money.

    And are her parents around? Maybe they have a couple million in the bank

    or friends at work took up a colection

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting jk
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    Why wouldn’t she look at the number when the door was open?

    my best guess is she never questioned it being her apartment. Her first thought was likely somebody broke in. As you said, why look at the number when you know you’re at your apartment.
    You don't question it as long as things seem normal. Once something seems amiss, however, and you are in a building like that, you ought to take the one second or less to look at the apartment number on the door, just as I did when I made that mistake of getting out on the wrong floor. Literally that one second is all it takes. For that reason my sympathy for her is extremely limited in this one. If I was a juror and heard her tell her version of events and believed it, I'd still say it was manslaughter. IMO her actions even in her own story were reckless.

    Quote Quoting jk
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    Why nof turn on the lights? Because if she was in the dark or low level light it makes it more difficult for a person with a gun to see her well enough to shoot her. Why do you think cops blind you with their headlights and spotlights when they pull you over? If lights up the car but it also gives them coverage. Same thing with a brilliantly bright flashlight. It makes the user harder to see.
    If she'd shined a flashlight on him, I'd agree with you. But she didn't. Him being in the dark made it harder for her to see him and, importantly, harder to see if there might be anyone else hiding there. It also means she's blind to the true threat she faces, making it more likely she either over or under reacts based on incomplete information. She runs the risk of letting her fears get away with her, which is certainly a distinct possibility here. Moreover, if the hallway outside her apartment was lit, then he would have seen a nice brilliant outline of her standing in the doorway, which would then blow your idea of keeping her hidden in the dark. So I see some potential tactical disadvantages to what she did.

    Quote Quoting jk
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    So rather than turning on the lights, why didn’t she use her flashlight. Again, my guess is things moved too quickly to do so.
    We have no facts so far to indicate that.

    Quote Quoting Who'sThatGuy
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    Lets play "Over or Under" 10 Years

    Me = under
    Assuming a conviction on manslaughter, my hope would be over. And if this was anyone but a cop, given the usual bent of Texas courts, it probably would be. The fact she's a white female cop (probably soon to be former cop) shouldn't make a difference, but it might get a her a break.

  6. #46
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting Taxing Matters
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    You don't question it as long as things seem normal. Once something seems amiss, however, and you are in a building like that, you ought to take the one second or less to look at the apartment number on the door, just as I did when I made that mistake of getting out on the wrong floor. Literally that one second is all it takes. For that reason my sympathy for her is extremely limited in this one. If I was a juror and heard her tell her version of events and believed it, I'd still say it was manslaughter. IMO her actions even in her own story were reckless.



    If she'd shined a flashlight on him, I'd agree with you. But she didn't. Him being in the dark made it harder for her to see him and, importantly, harder to see if there might be anyone else hiding there. It also means she's blind to the true threat she faces, making it more likely she either over or under reacts based on incomplete information. She runs the risk of letting her fears get away with her, which is certainly a distinct possibility here. Moreover, if the hallway outside her apartment was lit, then he would have seen a nice brilliant outline of her standing in the doorway, which would then blow your idea of keeping her hidden in the dark. So I see some potential tactical disadvantages to what she did.



    We have no facts so far to indicate that.



    Assuming a conviction on manslaughter, my hope would be over. And if this was anyone but a cop, given the usual bent of Texas courts, it probably would be. The fact she's a white female cop (probably soon to be former cop) shouldn't make a difference, but it might get a her a break.
    I don’t know the layout of the apartment nor where she was in the apartment. Your points have some validity but as you also stated, there are no facts to support your contentions either. I could apply counterpoints that would give possible situstions that would make your concerns invalid. Obviously we could continue back and forth but without facts it’s only guessing, and that is what I said my statements were.

    A couple odd points.

    There are claimed witnesses that state they heard Guyger pounding on the door and demanding to be let in.

    If she lives alone, why? Who would she be calling to and if the door was ajar or her key somehow opened the door, again; why pound on the door or call to an empty apartment to let her in.

    If she pounded on the door and yelled to the resident, wouldn’t it be normal for a person to find out who is banging on the door? Yet there is no suggestion the resident was near the door.

    If her key somehow opened the door. It would give her even more reason to believe it was her apartment.

    That is the big problem I have in not accepting the door wasn’t unlocked or even unlatched statement. How else would she get in (btw kk1968, apparently a chipped key is standard security for this apartment complex)?

    unless it is shown that Guyger was very familiar with the decedent and as such could suggest an intentional murder, I’m guessing she walks.

  7. #47
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting jk
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    yes, According to her. Do you have another witness? Without another witness it becomes very difficult to overcome her statement if it is plausible.
    You didn't watch the family's attornies' press release speaking to the affidavit, did you?

    They say two people heard knocking accompanied by, 'let me in' just prior to the shots being fired.

    One of them handed over video.

    They seemed to be displeased that the Ranger's purportedly did not interview the witnesses prior to swearing out the warrant.

    Tired, drunk, stoned, or angry etc would all be excuses I don't think would get you a pass on a reckless driving ticket.... maybe a brain tumor might.

    Being a cop should result in her being held to a more stringent standard than a private citizen, not more relaxed.

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting KK1968
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    Tired, drunk, stoned, or angry etc would all be excuses I don't think would get you a pass on a reckless driving ticket.... maybe a brain tumor might.
    What? She's not getting a pass. She screwed up. She's been charged with what the law allows her to be charged with. Hopefully she will be convicted and serve some time. I wouldn't give you good odds on the former and only so-so odds on the latter but it's possible.

  9. #49
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting KK1968
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    You didn't watch the family's attornies' press release speaking to the affidavit, did you?

    They say two people heard knocking accompanied by, 'let me in' just prior to the shots being fired.

    One of them handed over video.

    They seemed to be displeased that the Ranger's purportedly did not interview the witnesses prior to swearing out the warrant.

    Tired, drunk, stoned, or angry etc would all be excuses I don't think would get you a pass on a reckless driving ticket.... maybe a brain tumor might.
    Seriously dude, this is going to a grand jury. That is where the evidence is important.

    I saw a video by a bystander. All it showed was the cop pacing while on the phone, when she was calling 911 to report the situation.

    all reports state she did not appear drunk or high. They are waiting on results

    fatigue due to working 18 hours may get her a pass


    did you even bother to read the Texas definition of reckless for this? I didn’t think so because you are ignoring what was said.


    btw, it is policy to leave their body cams at the precinct. Sorry but another conspiracy theory shot to hell

    and gee, the families attorney (just why do they need an attorney anyway) that spins things for the best interest of his client. I’ve never heard of such a thing.

  10. #50
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    Default Re: Was She on Drugs and Toting a Crowbar

    Quote Quoting jk
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    I saw a video by a bystander. All it showed was the cop pacing while on the phone, when she was calling 911 to report the situation.

    all reports state she did not appear drunk or high. They are waiting on results

    fatigue due to working 18 hours may get her a pass


    did you even bother to read the Texas definition of reckless for this? I didn’t think so because you are ignoring what was said.


    btw, it is policy to leave their body cams at the precinct. Sorry but another conspiracy theory shot to hell
    I read the Texas definition of reckless and at the very least she was reckless, tired or not.

    Had she been so tired that she was swerving all over the road, still reckless and made the decision to drive just like a person blind running drunk driving blacked out does, or at least made the decision to get drunk/tired.

    I am aware her body cam is to be left at the precinct, so, the sarcasm was wasted, such a shame.

    Why wouldn't his family accept and/or seek legal counsel?

    Wouldn't yours if a cop, or anyone, shot and killed you in your home offering only an absurd poppycock story and was allowed to leave without being arrested?

    You should take the 20 minutes to listen to that conference.

    I did and there is one spot that had me concerned for one detail they were pitching.

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