Quote Quoting Lol_irl
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You bring up a good point and that's why I was wondering if it being a rental mattered at all. I have no idea when the speedometer was calibrated, how can I be responsible for knowing the equipment in a rental is accurate? I wasn't going downhill, slight incline actually I believe.
My point here is that the officer's speed measuring devices are calibrated and certified, whereas yours are not and more than likely will be off by a few MPH. In addition, the court recognizes the officer as an expert witness when it comes to visually estimating speed and convictiuons have been had on visual estimation alone. Your defense here is that you were speeding, but wish to quibble over the exact speed based on an uncalibrated speed measuring device operated by a person untrained in estimating or measuring speed, who does not know when or where his speed was actually measured. Consider whose testimony the court will consider more credible.

Quote Quoting Lol_irl
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I'm a little surprised that the time mistake holds no weight. I know it's nit-picky but not only for my selfish motivations I would think details like this should matter on any citation. I could provide proof I was not there at 1pm and should instantly be a "Get the paperwork right next time" situation for the officer.
Real court is not like court on television dramas. If an i is not doted or a t is not crossed, the case is not dismissed with the apologies of the court, you are not sent home with a generous stipend to compensate you for your inconvenience, and the officer is not reprimanded, fired or sent to jail for his clerical error. This is real life and all the court is concered about is whether or not you committed the violation.

As cdwjava mentioned, sufficient errors can be used to question the officer's credibility as a witnes (thoroughness, accuracy, attention to detail) but the errors have to be pretty egregious and numerous for you to succeed. There have been situations where a driver will point out a minor clerical error in court, thinking it will be a slam dunk in getting his ticket dismissed, only to have the judge turn to the officer and ask if he would like to seek the court's permission to amend the citation on the spot to reflect the correct information. The officer will say yes, the judge will mark the correction on the court's copy of the citation, advise the driver that his concerns have been addressed and ask him if he has any more issued to be considered.

Realizing thet his Perry Mason moment has been blasted into oblivion, the driver is usually left with nothing else to say, or he just stands there and blusters, again saying nothing meaningful.

I'm not trying to be snarky here, but the simple fact is you're not innocent, you just don't want to be guilty and are treating this like a game - follow certain procedures and you might get out of it. Will your ego really be that crushed and will the world come to an end if you man (or woman) up, take responsibility for what you did and pay the thcket or go to traffic school? Its not the end of the world. .