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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1

    Question Dispute with Mechanic After Payment

    My question involves a consumer law issue in the State of: Indiana

    So my girl goes to have her car fixed. The mechanic says she blew the engine. The estimate is $644 so we say go for it.

    2 weeks later and added charges for a fuel pump and filter, oil pan, gaskets and the like, they call today and say it is ready to pick up. My woman asks what the total is, $847. So she goes to the bank, gets the cash and picks up the car. And hour later the mechanic calls and says they forgot to add a $200+ charge for the new block.

    How can someone raise the price of a repair bill after you paid for it? If there was a mistake on their part, is it on us to make further payment?

    The original estimate is on the bill/receipt we have. It also says paid in full on it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Behind a Desk
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    74,168

    Default Re: Dispute with Mechanic After Payment

    You think that if a store makes a mistake, whatever they forget to charge you for is free? Sorry, no, they can bill you for the mistaken omission.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Dispute with Mechanic After Payment

    Quote Quoting llamabox
    View Post

    The original estimate is on the bill/receipt we have. It also says paid in full on it.
    You paid in full, and you got the proof to show it. Case closed. There's nothing they can do about it. NOTHING!

    If the shop pushed, tell him to take you to court, and you got the receipt to show and it was paid in full. Why does he want more money.

    ---------------
    My personal opinion is that they get the extra money from her, for the original cost, so they are trying to see if they will get more.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    between here and there, but you can't here from there
    Posts
    547

    Default Re: Dispute with Mechanic After Payment

    Quote Quoting llamabox
    View Post
    My question involves a consumer law issue in the State of: Indiana

    So my girl goes to have her car fixed. The mechanic says she blew the engine. The estimate is $644 so we say go for it.

    2 weeks later and added charges for a fuel pump and filter, oil pan, gaskets and the like, they call today and say it is ready to pick up. My woman asks what the total is, $847. So she goes to the bank, gets the cash and picks up the car. And hour later the mechanic calls and says they forgot to add a $200+ charge for the new block.

    How can someone raise the price of a repair bill after you paid for it? If there was a mistake on their part, is it on us to make further payment?

    The original estimate is on the bill/receipt we have. It also says paid in full on it.

    I usually don't quote stuff, but I want to pick this apart in detail.

    Are you sure she blew the engine? Are you sure it was replaced? The price is an oddball number and does not represent the cost of a new engine. Average cost of an engine from a junkyard is around $550 to $750 and it can be hard to tell a boneyard engine from original. Make sure the engine is a transplant, not one that was fixed and overcharged for.


    As an auto tech, I will not replace an engine unless I replace gaskets, seals, belts and do a complete service on the incoming engine. Its out, its easy to access everything, now's the time to do it.

    Can you see any new gasket edges? Is the engine clean?

    The block charge is tricky. In order to detirmine if this is legit, I have to know if the car ran, even if very crappy, when she took it in for repair. If it did not and there was a hole in the block, a core charge is ok. Pay it.

    But, if there was no hole in the block, it wasn't bleeding oil profusely, or it ran, there should be no core charge. Here is why: Boneyards sometimes have rebuildable engines that have value to rebuilders. If the block has massive damage and cannot be rebuilt, the core is to cover loss. If it ran, didn't spill its guts on the parking lot, and had no hole, it is a rebuildable core.

    Often times, shops charge a core charge to the customer, even when not warranted { I know-- no surprise, right??}. This provides a larger profit margin as they will still turn in the core.

    If it is decided that you do owe the core charge, demand your parts back. By law, they are yours and they cannot keep them. If they tell you that they threw it away, do not pay. most likely, they returned it for the core refund already.

    Remember that this is a business transaction on both parts: You paid for a service of replacing an engine. You pay for that and you get parts and service. If you have to apy a core, you are entitled to return of your old parts, not just any engine laying around, but the very one that came form your car along with any and all parts attached to that engine. Also, if ther is a warranty on that engine, you have the right to know who is warrantying it, {the source where it was bought}. You can ask them if the core was given to them.

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