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  1. #1
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    Question Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Quote Quoting bella2001
    Yes it would have been a mistake even if i didn't get caught. But getting caught made me realize that it was a mistake.

    Is this statement an oxymoron or a paradox? It's been a long time since school and I haven't the time to webster the two words.....

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Definitions of oxymoron on the Web:

    * A paradox reduced to two words, usually in an adjective-noun ("eloquent silence") or adverb-adjective ("inertly strong") relationship, and is used for effect, to emphasize contrasts, incongruities, hypocrisy, or simply the complex nature of reality. Examples: wise fool, ignorantly learned, laughing sadness, pious hate. Some others:
    home.cfl.rr.com/eghsap/apterms.html

    * a combination of contradictory terms, also considered a paradox. It is usually reduced to two words that have an adverb-adjective or an adjective-noun relationship. Example: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. "Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O heavy lightness, serious vanity; Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!" (1.1). ...
    www.georgiasouthern.edu/~dougt/terms.htm

    * A descriptive phrase that includes two terms that seem incongruent. For instance, freezing heat or bitter sweet. See also Trope.
    sun-design.com/poetry/

    * Meaning established by the association of incongruous or contradictory words. Ex: "Military Intelligence" "Silent scream" "Cafeteria food"
    faculty.valencia.cc.fl.us/drogers/poetry/ptrygl.html

    * oxímoron (joining together contradictory or incongruous terms in one expression -- "senectud lozana, decrépito verdor");
    www.dur.ac.uk/m.p.thompson/rhetoric.htm

    * A figure of speech containing an apparent contradiction. "Jumbo shrimp" is an often-cited example.
    www.catch-word.com/glossary.html

    * a figure of speech which yokes two contradictory terms
    http://www.nwlg.org/pages/resources/...es/english.htm

    * The association of two terms that seem to contradict each other, as in the expression “wise fool” or “jumbo shrimp.”
    http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/b...section2.rhtml

    * a contradiction in terms, sometimes an error and sometime a figure of speech. Some fun is had by finding accidental oxymorons or by alleging that certain terms, such as "military intelligence," are oxymorons. But some oxymorons such as "deafening silence" are intended figures of speech: "The searing cold of the frozen pipe seized my tongue." "Searing" is an effect of great heat, not of cold. ...
    http://www.io.com/~eighner/books/lav.../glossary.html

    * "An oxymoron is a type of paradox that combines two terms ordinarily seen as opposites, such as Milton's description of God in Paradise Lost as 'Dark with excessive bright.' Simply put, oxymoron is the combination of words which, at first view, seem to be contradictory or incongruous, but whose surprising juxtaposition expresses a truth or dramatic effect, such as, cool fire, deafening silence, or wise folly" (University of Victoria Writer's Guide).
    http://www.baylorschool.org/academic...x/figlang.html

    * Use of an epithet of contrary significance, as in 'in faith unfaithful'.
    www.geocities.com/Axiom43/literary.html

    * involves a combination of two contradictory or conflicting words. It is different from a paradox in that it creates its effect much more compactly, using a combination of two successive words while a paradox involves a complete statement.
    pc.pickeringcollege.on.ca/faculty/ijohnston/some_poetic_terms.htm

    * A figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (eg That shirt is pretty ugly.)
    www.armour.k12.sd.us/Mary's%20Classes/literary_terms_glossary.htm

    * Two normally contradictory terms combined paradoxically, as 'a living death'.
    www.benybont.co.uk/triolet/terms-m.htm

    * putting two contradictory words together
    www.english.uwosh.edu/roth/poetry-terms.htm

    * a contradiction in terms, placed very close to each other, like 'grimly gay' in Wilfred Owen's The Send- Off (p.104). See antithesis, contrast.
    http://www.aberconwy.conwy.sch.uk/cu...7/glossary.htm

    * an expression uniting two contradictory terms to give it point ("O heavy lightness ... Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health")
    mitglied.lycos.de/FrankGemkow/lyrik/lyrik3.htm

    * two words with different meanings put together to emphasis the intended effect, eg blinding light, deafening silence, living death.
    www.poetrypark.com/glossary.htm

    * conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')
    wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

    * An oxymoron (plural "oxymora") (noun) is a figure of speech that combines two normally contradictory terms (e.g. "deafening silence"). Oxymoron is a Greek term derived from oxy ("sharp") and moros ("dull"). Oxymora are a proper subset of the expressions called contradiction in terms. ...
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxymoron

    * Oxymoron is a street punk/Oi! band that was called into being in late 1992 actually, although the roots of the band go back further to the fall of 1989.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxymoron_(band)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Definitions of paradox on the Web:

    * (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"
    wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

    * A paradox is an apparently true statement or group of statements that seems to lead to a contradiction or to a situation that defies intuition. Typically, either the statements in question do not really imply the contradiction; or the puzzling result is not really a contradiction; or the premises themselves are not all really true (or, cannot all be true together). ...
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox

    * Paradox is a relational database management software originally released from Ansa-Software. Now it is owned by Corel as a part of their WordPerfect office suite.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_(database)

    * paradoja (a conclusion contrary to what the audience has been led to expect; a statement or proposition which on the face of it seems self-contradictory, absurd or at variance with common sense, but on investigation may prove to be well-founded -- "vivo sin vivir en mí ... muero porque no muero ... si más vivo más muero ... vivo ya porque no muero");
    www.dur.ac.uk/m.p.thompson/rhetoric.htm

    * A statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. An argument that apparently derives self-contradictory conclusions by valid deduction from acceptable premises. A person that possesses seemingly contradictory qualities or phases.
    www.poestories.com/wordlist.php

    * an argument which seems to justify a self-contradictory conclusion by using valid deductions from acceptable premises.
    www.filosofia.net/materiales/rec/glosaen.htm

    * Originally, any surprising, puzzling, or counter-intuitive claim, especially a counter-intuitive truth. In modern logic, a concept or proposition that is not only self-contradictory, but for which the obvious alternatives are either self-contradictory or very costly. See Grelling's paradox; Liar paradox; material implication, paradoxes of; Russell paradox; Skolem paradox. Partial function. A function whose value is undefined for some arguments. See total function. Power set. ...
    http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/cours...s/glossary.htm

    * A paradox is a valid statement which is self?contradictory or appears to be wrong. Paradoxes are important to the development of logic systems. Example: The barber shaves all the men in this village who do not shave themselves'seems a reasonably elear statement. However given that the barber is a man and lives in that village, who shaves the barber?
    ddi.cs.uni-potsdam.de/Lehre/TuringLectures/MathNotions.htm

    * A statement or situation which seems contradictory, as in, "One who loses her life shall find it."
    gbgm-umc.org/umw/corinthians/glossary.stm

    * A paradox is a statement which contains apparently opposing or incongrous elements which, when read together, turn out to make sense. Emily Dickinson's poem "My Life Closed Twice Before its Close" contains a paradox in both the title and the first line. She says:
    theliterarylink.com/definitions.html

    * A statement that contradicts or seems to contradict itself, yet often expresses a truth, such as "Less is more".
    http://www.msnucleus.org/membership/...efinitions.htm

    * The Greek philosopher Zeno (circa 460 BC) is famous for several paradoxes. In one Achilles couldn't catch a tortoise because he had first to reach the point where the tortoise started. Meanwhile, the tortoise would move to another point, etc. B. Russell has discovered paradoxes of infinity (The set of all sets that do not contain themselves - does it contain itself?) There are semantic paradoxes (All Web page authors are liars) and self-referential ones.
    math-terms.org/p.html

    * Seemingly absurd statement which, on closer examination, reveals an important truth eg Wordsworth's ' The child is father of the man'.
    http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossar...ic_terms_p.htm

    * a figure of speech in which an apparent contradiction contains a truth
    http://www.nwlg.org/pages/resources/...es/english.htm

    * A statement that seems contradictory on the surface but often expresses a deeper truth. The comment, “All men destroy the things they love” is a paradox.
    http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/b...section2.rhtml

    * A DBMS for end users and application developers. It includes new Experts that automate virtually every common database task, and a range of usability enhancements that help beginner users. It also includes new visual productivity tools that allow power users and professional developers to extend the Paradox environment to deliver advanced Windows database applications. Runs on Windows 95 and Windows NT and costs approximately $300.
    home.comcast.net/~mtsonata/FinalProject/glossary.html

    * A statement that seems contradictory but may actually be true, as "Slow and steady wins the race."
    oneonta.k12.ny.us/hs/murphy/terms.htm

    * a contradiction, beyond the contradiction in terms that is an oxymoron. "We ****ed until we were virgins." While this seems quite paradoxical, the reader may figure out that what is meant is that the parties exhausted their sexual desire and then related to each other as innocents would.
    http://www.io.com/~eighner/books/lav.../glossary.html

    * "A statement that contains seemingly contradictory elements or appears contrary to common sense, yet can be seen as perhaps, or indeed, true when viewed from another angle, such as Alexander Pope's statement in 'An Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot' that a literary critic could 'damn with faint praise.'" (Glossary of Poetic Terms).
    http://www.baylorschool.org/academic...x/figlang.html

    * (GK 'beside/beyond opinion') Originally a paradox was merely a view which contradicted accepted opinion. By round about the middle of the 16th c. the word had acquired the commonly accepted meaning it now has: an apparently self-contradictory (even absurd) statement which, on closer inspection, is found to contain a truth reconciling the conflicting opposites. Basically, two kinds may be distinguished:
    members.fortunecity.es/fabianvillegas/drama/glossary-p.htm

    * An apparent break in temporal causality where cause of an event follows or appears to follow the event itself.
    http://www.coldnorth.com/owen/game/s...e/temporal.htm

    * an assertion seemingly opposed to common sense, but that may yet have some truth in it. *What a pity that youth must be wasted on the young. George Bernard Shaw (A Glossary of Rhetorical Terms with Examples, Ross Scaife)
    www.iprr.org/defs/DEFINPQR.html

    * a statement that seems contradictory but that actually makes some kind of sense
    academics.hamilton.edu/english/ckodat/150Wlitterm.html

    * "A statement or expression so surprisingly self‑contradictory as to provoke us into seeking another sense or context in which it would be true. . ."Paradoxical language is valued in literature as expressing "a mode of understanding [that] . . . challenges our habits of thought." (CB)
    classes.berklee.edu/llanday/resources/terms.htm

    * Paradox is a seemingly self-contradictory statement that contains an element of truth.
    http://www.pearsoned.ca/text/flachma...ss_iframe.html

    * n. a statement that seems absurd or self-contradictory, but which turns out to have a believable and coherent meaning. For example, "Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink" is a paradox.
    station05.qc.ca/csrs/bouscol/anglais/book_report/glossary3.html

    * A contradiction that creates tension in a work.
    http://www.moondance.org/2001/summer.../literary.html

    * Paradox is the tendency of an arrow to fly straight ahead, although it is pointed to one side on the bow. This is accomplished by a series of diminishing bends of the shaft, which ultimately straightens out in flight.
    http://www.stickbow.com/stickbow/bow.../glossary.html

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Holy sh*t!!!! You came up with all that in JUST 2-3 minutes!!! I'm glad ya didn't wait.....would've been up to a 5 or 6 page dissertation given 10-15 minutes.

    Oh, thanx btw....

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Quote Quoting souperdave
    Holy sh*t!!!! You came up with all that in JUST 2-3 minutes!!! I'm glad ya didn't wait.....would've been up to a 5 or 6 page dissertation given 10-15 minutes.

    Oh, thanx btw....
    I am NOT a man of few words....

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Now I got some homework to do.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up Re: Shoplifting in Michigan

    Quote Quoting seniorjudge
    I am NOT a man of few words....
    I didn't think so......you're a man of a few 'thousand' words!

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